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history again this week when her statue was unveiled in the u.s. capital. we have not gotten to see the finished product yet, not until the unveiling in a few hours. what were the logistics involved in getting across the country from california where you work and also getting it set up in the capital is. >> guest: well my partner came out several days ago to coordinate the moving of it and she was in a warehouse in a crate for a little while here in washington. i wasn't here but i saw some photographs. they had a large crane and she weighs 2700 pounds. so they lifted her up with one of those long extension cranes, narrowly guided her into statuary hall. >> host: eugene daub your firm has done other sculptures. it any significant in your experience as this one? >> guest: well you know i don't think there is any as high-profile as high-profile as this one for sure. we have done jefferson and lincoln and louis and clark and a lot of other wonderful famous and important people but for some reason russo creates a stir and i think it's timely with black history month and her 100th anniver
. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense witnesses. there will be department secretary of defense, the comp driller and the joint chiefs of staff. i hope
reconstruction, john sopko delivered a report on you for spending so far show in the u.s. government spent over $7 million on a largely unused building. his remarks from the center for strategic and international studies in washington d.c. rfid the minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. thanks for coming today. my name name is robert laman and director of the program in crisis conflict and cooperation here at csis. welcome. it is my pleasure today to be hosting john sopko who is the special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction known by the acronym sigar. mr. sopko has been a state and federal prosecutor. he has been congressional counsel, senior federal government adviser. he has been the chief counsel for oversight and investigation for the house committee on energy and commerce and has also been on the chief oversight counsel for homeland security. and under then senator sam nunn, he was on the senate subcommittee for investigation staff. he has worked at commerce at the justice department, at the state and federal level and today he is the special inspector general f
to be commander u.s. central command and general david rodriguez u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. these two combatant commands centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for our military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. oath nominees have served our country with distinction and i want to thank each of you for your decades of military service and your willingness to serve once again. i understand that general austin 's wife charlene and general rodriguez' wife jen air with us this morning and i want to a knowledge them and thank them for their sacrifices, their support to our nominees throughout the years which is so essential to the success of our nominees and as is the committee's tradition are nominees are invited to introduce any family members or friends who may be with them this morning with their opening remarks. if confirmed general austin will assume command of centcom during it critical transition. not for military operations in afghanistan. in the coming months afghan forces will assume the lead responsibility for providing
year in the u.s. come involving transportation crashes, 32,000 of those occur on the nation's highways are 95% of all of our transportation fatalities. so what do i see is the biggest risks we face in our nation's highways? first, impaired driving. the ntsb on this issue in our most wanted list of safety improvement. where the top 10 list of things that they can be changed. and impaired driving really had up that list. that is the number one killer of transportation. 10,000 people every year are killed and impaired driving accident. they made recommendations based on a study was completed and released in december and so we be happy to talk with you all about technology and i mentioned that later. another issue that's gotten attention is distraction. they are ubiquitous in transportation our life and i see many of them on the table here inside sure many of you will be using some electronic devices later after the embargo. when we talk about distractions in all modes of transportation. i'm pleased to be our investigations in a series that your interest is. >> we paid extra for this good
certainly have seen since. >> now secretary of state hillary clinton on the u.s. role in the world. she's at the council of foreign relations today for now and will meet with president from the white house tomorrow, her last day as secretary. her successor senator john kerry will be at the state department monday for a welcoming ceremony. [inaudible conversations] [applause] [applause] >> please take your seats. good afternoon and on behalf of bob rubin, carla he'll who is with us today, the entire board of directors and their members can't i want to welcoming you to the council on foreign relations and i'm richard haas president of cfr. are those of you who don't know who we are, we are an independent nonpartisan membership organization of think-tank and a publisher and we are dedicated to improving the understanding of the world of the foreign-policy choices facing this country. and today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state week here in the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six a
in manufacturing. then a discussion on the future of u.s. manufacturing. >> older and more mature, absolutely more strategy to achieve happiness in life is to make that you're part marital. you will not achieve it. instead you will then there being narcissistic, self involved, caring about your own pleasures and their own satisfactions of life as your paramedical. what i have found is that happiness is best found it as a byproduct of other things. a byproduct of meaningful work and family and friends and good health and love and care. involving ourselves in fundamentally trying to have integrity and being a good person. >> conscious capitalism, whole foods co-founder and ceo john mackey examines how the inherent good about business and capitalism can lead to a better world the sunday night at 9:00 p.m. on after words on c-span2. find more book tv on line. like us on facebook. >> the head of the gay and lesbian task force, her annual state of the movement speech calling for an executive order to protect federal workers from discrimination based on sexual orientation. discusses the fight for equal r
agencies and what not. and this may surprise you but not all parts of the u.s. government work together seamlessly. [laughter] so here we are, as this cycle and we have these things, what we call blinks between the parts and so one element would find a target but by the time the information got to the people who were going to fix it usually with a predator or something like that to make sure they're there then, time would have passed and accuracy of information, fidelity would have passed. then it would be passed over to the raid force. again you have a loss. like the game telephone where you whisper around the room, it is untellable by the fifth person we're trying to do things in that system. we said this is madness. it won't work. we went on a campaign to fix that process, bringing in different parts of the organization, building intelligence capacity. giving ourselves a mind-set that was different before. if each element did its part of the process they could take pride, we succeeded, we did what we were told. we wiped that clean, nobody is successful unless the whole process works.
. [laughter] >> nine-zip, you know. now, as some of you know, as doug said, we worked noth the u.s. attorney's office, but the notion i was his boss is a complete joke. but it's always a privilege to be with him today, and it's a privilege actually to be included in this important annual meeting. i'd particularly like to welcome this organization's newest members. 11 state attorneys general who are participating for the first time and i'd like to recognize and thank all the good friends and colleagues here today. thank you for lending your time, you diverse perspectives and your talent to this association's critical work. over the past four years i've been fortunate to work with many of the leaders in the room to confront range of criminal justice, law enforcement, and national security challenges. alongside my colleagues and court parts in the obama administration, including vice president biden, director cordray, and associate attorney general tony west, all of whom you're hearing from this week. we have accomplished, i think, a great deal working together with you across state boundaries
's innovation. they're a big part of why the u.s. remains the destination for the world's best and brightest. investment in education leads to inknow vacation, which heeds to more opportunities and jobs for all. our problem? the investment we make is not yielding the maximum return. each year our colleges and universities graduate approximately 40,000 foreign nationals with masters and ph.d degrees. many of whom are then forced to leave the country because there are not enough visas in our immigration system to permit them to stay. so rather than being able continue vent things here in america, grow businesses or start one of their own, they do all these things somewhere else. now, fiona is here with us today. she is earning her masters at gw school of engineering in applied sciences. originally from china, she been in the united states for five years, studying operations research in the systems engineering department. if you talk to her you'll see, she is pretty smart. she'd like to stay here. she wants to invest her talents in america and maybe even start her own company, but she has seen
and in the u.s. army working on an array of projects ranging from spacecraft designed to biological texan systems and to a ph.d. at mit's sloan school in 1967. the next year something surprisinsurprisin g happened. he was asked to direct budget policy issues for the hubert humphrey presidential campaign. this approach reminded tom that he had actually regarded himself as a republican. he politely declined the offer and offered his services instead to the richard nixon campaign. during the nixon transition in late 1968, he worked on defense and budget planning and an obscure attic on lafayette square with an elite team that included allen greenspan, john deutch and james wilson. during his first year at the nixon white house he became increasingly concerned that the federal communications policies were suppressing technological innovation and conceived of the idea for special white house office to break the logjam of hcn commercial protectionism. he sold that notion but floundered on the task for finding the right person to head the effort. reluctantly, and over the objections of many coll
. >> mr. chairman u.s. what happens if the debt rises and stays high and prices and there are some costs that i think are quite predictable and other risks that are created. over time, not under the current economic conditions but under the conditions we expect later in the decade of nearly full employment in the economy, at that point in time that large amount of debt will crowd out some private new investment that would raise wages and income and the higher the debt is, the more that investment is likely to be crowded out and the greater depressing effect on wages and incomes. we report those estimates to you. there are also risks that are involved. some countries that have had very high levels of debt and have not communicated and not persuaded their potential lenders that they have a plan for getting the debt under control have faced a fiscal crisis which we defined at -- is the point in which the government is able to borrow at an affordable rate. currently there government is not in a position in treasury interest rates are extraordinarily low. our projection calls for a normalizat
to be the u.s. attorney's office in the country if others are here from other u.s. attorneys offices, we apologize for her superiority. [laughter] , down. i am a leader sam sali get that all the time. she joins the faculty at ohio state university in 1995 and was awarded tenure in 1999 and promoted to full professor in 2002. her primary search focuses on the area of the criminal law procedure and she is published widely in overall ayittey of journalists and places where her ideas about critical, legal and social matters have certainly been expressed. so i'm going to have the professor davies come to the podium and share with us for about 12 or so minutes about her ideas about our topic today. she will lay the groundwork on the bias and the implicit racism so that legislators and the rest of us can better understand how it manifests itself in the racism and the systemic discrimination that we've been talking about already and help people can act against their conscience principles and values. you think you are doing one thing clean and clear and the individual attribution of good things t
questions to five minutes each, the chair opens it, and the chair recognizes himself for five minutes. the u.s. lost sental near iran, and iranians claimed to spoof the gps signal that was in operation with that. last summer, professor humphries from the university of texas, austin said it is possible to spoof the systems to take control of the unmanned aircraft. the testimony states that military gps signals unlike the nonmilitary gps signals, unlike the military gps signals are not encrypted in transparency and predictability make them easily counterfeited or spoofed. ask what research and development is being conducted to address this concern and are there any research and development gaps that you're aware of? dr. toner, if you could start off, and dr. wagner, if you could fill in any gaps that dr. toner leaves out. >> thank you, mr. chairman. you mentioned the very careful experimentation mentioned by the students in texas, and we're aware of those, and, believe me, the security of the communication and control system is one of the key challenges we've looked at for uas, and i mentioned
't mess around with the public debt in the u.s. senate because he would have a negative impact on our economy and the world economy. tom mentioned that nobody is suggesting we not pay the public debt. that qualification is important here because earlier the numbers used for the u.s. over $16 trillion, which was the entire data. the public debt is a little over $11 trillion. there are many of our republican colleagues who have said it's okay for the united states to default on its other nonpublic obligations. and they said that's why they're not going to raise the dead skin because the president will prioritize, pay the bond holders, but it's okay if that means he has to put pressure by not pay another obligations, which includes social security, medicare, payments to troops and other kinds of obligations. i'm not one of those. >> i'm not saying you are. there's a piece of legislation in the house and that is playing with fire and our economy. it's totally irresponsible. so to get to bob's question on the constitutional issue, i don't know the answer. there is a legal answer to that qu
that border really well. i mean, i was the u.s. attorney in arizona and i'm from new mexico originally. i have worked that border my whole life and that border now is as secure in the last two decades. it doesn't mean we don't have more to do. there is always more to do but it's in been an unprecedented and historic effort and now because of a budget impasse, you have to begin to look at rolling back those agents and slowing hiring and getting rid of overtime which we use a lot between the ports of entry. that will have a real impact. >> just a few months ago governor jindal from louisiana was outside and he accused the president of trying to scare people. can you say for the record that you were not here just trying to scare people and what you are saying has to happen and is a necessity as a result of these cuts? >> i'm not here to scare people. i'm here to inform and also to let people begin to plan because they are going to see these impacts in their daily lives and they are going to have to adjust and make their arrangements accordingly. and it won't be like a shutdown where like turning
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16